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2103, 2017

The REAL Vincent van Gogh

By |March 21st, 2017|Categories: Artists, Contemporary, Film, Impressionist, Museums|32 Comments

Self Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1989
Vincent van Gogh, (1853-1890)

Myth:  Van Gogh was a manic, possibly slightly deranged man who just spontaneously threw paint at the canvas.

Truth:  He was a very experienced artist (he made 900 paintings in ten years) and doggedly honed his skills. He created very deliberate compositions.
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Red Vineyard at Arles, 1888
Vincent van Gogh

Myth: Van Gogh never sold a painting in his lifetime.

Truth: Van Gogh sold ONE painting during his lifetime, Red Vineyard at Arles, to a Russian collector, Sergei Shchukin. This painting now resides at the Pushkin Museum in Moscow.
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Vincent's Bedroom in Arles, 1888 Digital version shows what may be the original violet walls.

Vincent’s Bedroom in Arles, 1888
Digital version shows what may be the original violet walls.

Myth: In Van Gogh’s beloved painting of his bedroom in Arles, France, the walls were painted blue.

Truth: New high-tech research shatters Van Gogh myth! Van Gogh originally painted the walls of his bedroom a pale lilac, not blue! The reason…purple (lilac) is the complementary color of yellow. He experimented with new pigments. These new pigments, particularly the color red, proved to be unstable and the red pigment disappeared after a short time changing to blue.
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Don’t miss this video! Watch as Vincent van Gogh’s masterpieces come alive!
Click here if you are unable to view the video.

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512, 2016

Once in a Lifetime Art Exhibition!

By |December 5th, 2016|Categories: Artists|14 Comments

The Red Room, 1908 Henri Matisse The Hermitage Museum, Paris

The Red Room, 1908
Henri Matisse
The Hermitage Museum, Paris

You may feel a surge of joy when you see the ORIGINAL Matisse “The Red Room.” You may be brought to tears. You will certainly be stopped in your tracks.

Perhaps you think you know “The Red Room” from a thousand dorm room posters, but no reproduction can capture the depth of the vermillion wallpaper streaking down right onto the table, the cobalt blue of the sky from the window, the yellows…oh, oh, oh…

Pastorales Tahitiennes, 1892 Paul Gauguin Hermitage Museum, Russia

Pastorales Tahitiennes, 1892
Paul Gauguin
The Hermitage Museum, Russia

The artworks of the finest impressionists — Matisse, Gauguin, Picasso, Monet and many others — are on display until mid-February 2017, at the new Fondation Louis Vuitton Museum in Paris.

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris Observatory of Light by Daniel Buren, temporary installation

Fondation Louis Vuitton Museum, Paris
Frank Gehry, Architect
Temporary installation: Observatory of Light by Daniel Buren

One hundred thirty works of art have been allowed to leave the major museums of Russia, the Hermitage and the Pushkin, for the first time. Odds are we will never see these works together again in our lifetime.

The study in Sergei Shchukin’s house. Photograph: Heritage Images/Getty Images

The study in Sergei Shchukin’s house.
Photograph: Heritage Images/Getty Images

The collection was put together in the late 1800’s by Sergei Shchukin, a wealthy textile industrialist from Moscow. Twenty years later, after the Bolshevik revolution, Stalin and Lenin “nationalized” the collection, branding the paintings “degenerate” and dispersing them throughout Russia, some even exiled to Siberia!

Today, 100 years later, the collection is for the first time reunited in Paris, the blockbuster of all blockbusters…”Icons of Modern Art.”

Bonjour Paris!

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911, 2016

America How Great Thou ART!

By |November 9th, 2016|Categories: Artists, Contemporary, Folk Art, Modern, Museums|30 Comments

Flag, 1967 Jasper Johns, encaustic and collage on canvas (three panels) 33 1/2 x56 1/4in.

Flag, 1967
Jasper Johns
The Broad Museum, Los Angeles

Jasper Johns was an acclaimed artist known for his paintings of flags, targets, and other ordinary objects in the mid 20th century. He helped usher in the Pop Art era.

Jasper Johns:
“In Savannah, Georgia, in a park, there is a statue of Sergeant William Jasper. Once I was walking through this park with my father, and he said that we were named for him. Whether or not that is in fact true or not, I don’t know. Sergeant Jasper lost his life raising the American flag over a fort [Fort Moultrie, American Revolutionary War].”
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Morning Day on the Farm, 1951 Grandma Moses

Morning Day on the Farm, 1951
Grandma Moses

Anna Mary Robertson Moses, nicknamed Grandma Moses, began painting at 78 and lived to 101.  Art historians say her work portrays homely American farm life and rural countryside.  But Grandma Moses had a different way to describe her subjects: “I like old-timey things—something real pretty,” she said. “Most of them are daydreams.”
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American Gothic, 1930 Grant Wood

American Gothic, 1930
Grant Wood
Art Institute of Chicago

With the onset of the Great Depression, the painting, American Gothic, came to be seen as a depiction of steadfast American pioneer spirit.

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1910, 2016

Surprise! Georgia O’Keeffe Watercolors

By |October 19th, 2016|Categories: Artists, Contemporary, Impressionist, Modern, Museums, Photography, Southwestern|11 Comments

Watercolor, Evening Star No. IV, 1917

Watercolor, Evening Star No. IV, 1917
Georgia O’Keeffe Museum

Surprise! Georgia O’Keeffe didn’t just make large iconic oil paintings of flowers, skyscrapers and bones against a desert landscape!

Georgia O'Keeffe at age 30 with her watercolors in Texas, 1916

Georgia O’Keeffe at age 30 with her watercolors in Texas, 1916
Photograph by Alfred Stieglitz

Miss O’Keeffe, not quite 30 and not yet famous, moved to Canyon, Texas, in 1916. She spent 17 months in the tiny Panhandle town, teaching at a local college and painting small, luscious watercolors of the Texas landscape and nude figures.

Sunrise and Little Clouds, 1916 Georgia O'Keffee

Sunrise and Little Clouds, 1916
Georgia O’Keffee Museum

Nude Series VIII, 1917 Georgia O'Keeffe Museum

Nude Series VIII, 1917
Georgia O’Keeffe Museum

Problem…Nude models were definitely frowned upon for women artists in 1917, and O’Keeffe was intensely interested in painting the human form.

Solution…O’Keeffe used her own body as her model.

O'Keeffe photographed at home in Abiquiú, New Mexico

O’Keeffe photographed at home in Abiquiú, New Mexico Photo by Philippe Halsman, 1948

In 1986, late in life and almost blind, O’Keeffe enlisted the help of several assistants to enable her to once again create art.

“I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life – and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do.” Georgia O’Keeffe

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